The Law episode 69: Blumenthal v. Trump

The Law episode 69: Blumenthal v. Trump

Just this week, a unanimous D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals threw out a lawsuit filed by over 200 members of Congress alleging Donald Trump is in violation of the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution. The court held the members of Congress did not have standing to bring the lawsuit. So this week, we discuss the Emoluments Clause itself and the concept of judicial “standing.” What does they mean? Check out this week’s edition of The Law for the answer.

The Law episode 69: Blumenthal v. Trump

The Law episode 67: The Death Penalty

The death penalty is back in the news this week as the Colorado General Assembly considers a bill to ban the punishment. Nationwide, the practice is on the decline. While the concept of a death penalty is constitutional, is it a good idea? Should the government be trusted with the power of execution? What role does the jury really play? Here are some thoughts for your consideration. 

The Law episode 69: Blumenthal v. Trump

The Law episode 66: Juliana v. US (9th Cir. 2020)

Just last week, in a 2-1 decision, the 9th Circuit correctly tossed out the “climate kids’” lawsuit seeking a judicial order requiring the executive and legislative branches to design and implement policy the plaintiffs had been unable to convince the political branches to enact. The plaintiffs sought no less than a judicial coup over the co-equal legislative and executive branches of the U.S. government. The Obama appointed federal judges rejected that unconstitutional request. 

The Law episode 69: Blumenthal v. Trump

The Law episode 65: “A Republic, If You Can Keep It” by Neil Gorsuch

United States Supreme Court Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch’s book, A Republic, If You Can Keep It, attempts to explain to non-lawyers the importance of the constitutional framework of our federal government. And he succeeds. He discusses how the separation of powers, when followed, protects our rights and liberties. He clarifies the job of federal judges and, more importantly, explains what judges are not supposed to do. We discuss all of that, and more.